Sunday, January 22, 2017

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 124

Born Again
Written by Charlie and Ira Louvin, sung by Jim and Jesse McReynolds and the Virginia Boys
 

 
Born Again

Borned again, free from sin
I’m happy night and day
Makes me shout, there’s no doubt
I know I’m borned again

Satan tells me that I only thought I got saved
He tells me what a fool I have been
But when my mind goes back to that
Old bench where I prayed
I know that I’ve been borned again
 
Borned again, free from sin
I’m happy night and day
Makes me shout, there’s no doubt
I know I’m borned again

Many times along the way my faith has grown weak
When burdens seem to rise on every hand
But when I steal away in prayer
He answers my plea, my every need he understands.
 

Borned again, free from sin
I’m happy night and day
Makes me shout, there’s no doubt
I know I’m borned again
 
 I know I’m borned again
 

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 123

Lonely Tombs
Written by J.E. Mainer, sung by the Stanley Brothers, Carter and Ralph 
 
 
Lonely Tombs

I was strolling one day in a lonely graveyard
When a voice from the tomb seemed to say
I once lived as you lived walked and talked as you talk
But from earth I was soon called away

Oh those tombs (oh those tombs) lonely tombs (lonely tombs)
Seemed to say in a low gentle tone
Oh how sweet (oh how sweet) is the rest (is the rest)
In our beautiful Heavenly home
 
Then I came to the place where my mother was laid
And in silence I stood by her tomb
And her voice seemed to say in a low gentle tone
I am safe with my Savior at home
 
Oh those tombs (oh those tombs) lonely tombs (lonely tombs)
Seemed to say in a low gentle tone
Oh how sweet (oh how sweet) is the rest (is the rest)
In our beautiful Heavenly home

Every voice from the tomb seemed to whisper and say
Living man you must soon follow me
And I thought as I looked on those cold marble slabs
What a dark lonesome place that must be

Oh those tombs (oh those tombs) lonely tombs (lonely tombs)
Seemed to say in a low gentle tone
Oh how sweet (oh how sweet) is the rest (is the rest)
In our beautiful Heavenly home

Friday, January 13, 2017

Valentine Collins .... Facts or Fiction ? Part 6

Recently while researching my Collins collateral lines, I ran across an article that made me scratch my head. I wouldn't have come across this if my 4th Great Grandfather, Valentine Collins hadn't been mentioned.

The mentioned article was an 'announcement' for "2nd annual Goins Book Reunion and Union of Goins Book relatives and Redbone descendants."  Read it here:  Goins Book Reunion
Or see this 'snip' from the article:


I must say, thanks for the invitation. Since I don't descend from the 'Redbones', this reunion would not have been of interest to me.

But with that said, I don't descend from Vardy Collins, but I am a double 4th Great-grandson of Valentine Collins.

There are a few statements written in this article , that I don't understand, and they have me scratching my head.

1."who matched the female Goins line perfectly as well as the South Carolina Sumter Goins"
I'm not sure exactly what 'perfect' means ?

2.Who matches the Goins female lines ?  Which test did this data come from, is there a GEDCOM file that backs this data up ?

3. I have no reason to believe Valentine Collins ever identified with the name 'Melungeon', never mind 'Redbone'.

Who knows, maybe this information is published in this 'Goins Book'. I tried to find a copy of this book to purchase, with no luck/ I appears the book isn't published yet ?

While I was searching for this book, I did come across this (which could just be a 'typo') :


Well, Joseph Goins was not the husband of Mahala Mullins nee Collins. Mahala Mullins was the wife of John Mullins and daughter of  Soloman D. Collins and Virginia Jane Gincy Goins.

Virginia Jane Gincy Goins line appears to be (I didn't vet this information, so I don't know how accurate it might be), Virginia Jane Gincy Goins > Joseph Goins, Millie Lovins > Joseph Goings, Emily Bunch > Agnes Gowen . So Joseph Goins was the maternal Grandfather of Mahala Collins Mullins, not her husband.

So is this fact or fiction, concerning the Valentine Collins line ?  As far as I can see, there isn't enough data/information to come to a conclusion. I'm interested to find out what a 'perfect' DNA match is and how that conclusion was made.

Here is an educational article concerning 'DNA matches'

Mean while, I'll keep checking to see when this 'Goins Book' becomes available.

 
That's my 2 cents..... 

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 122

I'm Gonna Sing Sing Sing
Written by Hank Williams Sr., sung by Charlie Monroe
 

 
I'm Gonna Sing Sing Sing

In this world of sorrow, I've seen troubles and woe
When I get to glory, I'll see no more
For I know my prayers have not been in vain
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing
I'm gonna let the Hallelujahs ring
I'm gonna praise my blessed Savior's name
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

Sometimes I get so weary inside
Then I recall how my Jesus died
Up there I know, there'll be no more pain
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing
I'm gonna let the Hallelujahs ring
I'm gonna praise my blessed Savior's name
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

Up there no tears will blind my eyes
As I'll walk along by my Jesus' side
I'll meet my loved ones all once again
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing
I'm gonna let the Hallelujahs ring
I'm gonna praise my blessed Savior's name
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing
I'm gonna let the Hallelujahs ring
I'm gonna praise my blessed Savior's name
When I get to glory, I'm gonna sing, sing, sing

Friday, January 6, 2017

Merry 'Old' Christmas

Appalachians once celebrated ‘Old Christmas’ 

(First published in The Mountain Eagle, a local weekly newspaper published in Whitesburg, Kentucky. It is the main newspaper of Letcher County, Kentucky and one of the primary newspapers of Eastern Kentucky.)


By Tony Blair

Christmas used to be celebrated on what is now January 6. The Catholic Church changed the day of celebration to December 25 in the late 1500’s. However, Protestant Great Britain and the American colonies continued celebrating the birth of Jesus on January 6 until the mid-1700’s.

Many of our independent thinking ancestors living in the southern Appalachian Mountains clung to the older traditional day of Christmas for another 100 years or so. Even today, some of us acknowledge the January 6 celebration of Old Christmas in our own quiet, non-commercial ways.

Following is a history of how “Old Christmas” came about:

Through the centuries before the birth of Christ, the calendar used by the Roman Empire was based on the phases of the moon. Several adjustments to the calendar, including changing the number of months, altered the number of days in a year, but none of the adjustments matched exactly the revolution of the earth around the sun.

In the last century before the birth of Christ, during the rule of Julius Caesar, the Julian calendar was adopted. The Julian calendar was based on the solar year and had 365 days in each year with an extra day added to February every 4 years to create Leap Year. Astronomers knew at that time that the Julian calendar did not exactly match the earth’s revolution around the sun; however, they apparently considered the error to be insignificant, and the Julian calendar was used for the next 16 centuries.

With Leap Days calculated in, the Julian calendar averaged 365 days plus 6 hours each year. The problem with that was the earth’s revolution around the sun was a few minutes shorter than that. The accumulated effect of these extra minutes included in the calendar each year added 3 extra days every 4 centuries. For example, if the spring equinox occurred on March 21 one year, then it would occur on March 18 four centuries later and on March 15 eight centuries later. These extra days threw off the alignment of Christianity’s most revered day, Easter, with the spring equinox. By the time a new calendar system was adopted, astronomers determined that 10 days needed to be removed from the Julian calendar to properly realign Easter with the spring equinox.

In 1582, under the leadership of Pope Gregory XIII, the Catholic Church adopted the Gregorian calendar that calculated leap days differently than did the Julian calendar. To realign Easter with the spring equinox, October 4, 1582, on the Julian calendar was followed the next day by October 15, 1582, on the Gregorian calendar. This removed the extra 10 days (October 5 through October 14) gained while using the Julian calendar.

In both the Julian calendar and the Gregorian calendar, Leap Years occur in those years that are divisible by 4. For example, 2012 and 2016 are Leap Years, and 2013, 1014, and 2015 are not Leap Years in both calendar systems. The Gregorian calendar differs from the Julian calendar in the following manner: In the Gregorian calendar, a year divisible by 100 is NOT a Leap Year unless the year is also divisible by 400. For example, 1600, 2000, and 2400 are Leap Years because each is divisible by both 100 and 400. 1700, 1800, 1900, 2100, 2200, and 2300 are not Leap Years in the Gregorian calendar because, although those years are divisible by 100, they are not divisible by 400. 1700, 1800, 1900, 2100, 2200, and 2300 are Leap Years in the old Julian calendar.

The Middle Ages, often defined as 500 A.D. to 1500 A.D., saw the rise of Christianity in the form of the Catholic Church. The Catholic Church became very wealthy and powerful, yielding total control over the daily affairs of everyone, from serfs to kings. The Catholic Church passed their own laws, created their own methods of paying homage, and accessed taxes. People feared to resist the Church; anyone one who did was excommunicated and condemned straight to Hell when they died.

By the end of the Middle Ages, the iron fisted rule of the Catholic Church was beginning to weaken. In England, King Henry VIII, who ruled from 1509 to 1547, broke with the Catholic Church and created the Church of England. Other conflicts with the Catholic Church occurred in England and northern Europe. Soon the Protestant Reformation was in full swing.

When Pope Gregory XIII and the Catholic Church adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1582, those countries which remained under the influence of the Catholic Church switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar. However, many of the countries which had become Protestant continued to use the Julian calendar.

The British Calendar Act of 1751 required the British Empire and the American Colonies to adopt the Gregorian calendar in September 1752. By this time, another day had been gained by the Julian calendar. To conform to the existing Gregorian calendar which had already removed the 10 days that the Julian calendar had improperly added, 11 days needed to be removed from the British calendar: Wednesday, September 2, 1752, was followed by Thursday, September 14, 1752. This jump of 12 days resulted in Christmas occurring 12 days earlier.

In the 170 years between the time the Gregorian calendar was adopted by the Catholic world and the time that it was finally adopted by Great Britain and her colonies, the New World was explored, colonies under British control were established on the eastern coast of America, and the southern Appalachian Mountains became settled by many of our ancestors. During this time, Great Britain and the American colonists still used the Julian calendar.

The pioneers of the southern Appalachian Mountains were a hardy lot and furiously independent. They wanted to live their lives in isolation, free of the intrusions of government. To be told by some far away government to change their calendar and the dates of their celebrations did not sit well with them. Many of them were less than enthusiastic about the new Gregorian calendar and were not willing to adopt all of its changes. Christmas had long been celebrated on January 6th, a couple of weeks after the winter solstice, and many people were not willing to celebrate Christmas on an earlier date; many continued to celebrate Old Christmas 12 days after the December 25th celebration date set by the new calendar.


 Since Appalachia stayed relatively isolated over the years, this tradition held on here long after most of the country had forgotten it. But, even here, the celebration of Old Christmas has faded away until today only a few of us still acknowledge the January 6 celebration of Old Christmas. Unfortunately, many of today’s young folks have never even heard of Old Christmas, letting alone, having celebrated it. In another generation or two, celebrating Old Christmas will be a thing of the past, and another old-time mountain tradition will have been completely forgotten.

Old Christmas side notes:

A story behind the break between England and the Catholic Church goes something like this. King Henry VIII of England was married to his first wife Catherine of Aragon when his roving eye fell upon the charming Anne Boleyn. Unlike her sister Mary, Anne resisted the King’s advances, so King Henry, a practicing Catholic, submitted to his papal supremacy a request for an annulment of his marriage to Catherine. However, the Pope denied the King’s request. 


Since the King’s passion for Anne was stronger than his Catholic devoutness, the King thumbed his nose at the Catholic Church, created the Church of England, and appointed himself to be the head of the new Church. Soon Anne Boleyn lived in the King’s castle, but the King’s passion for her soon died and Anne did too; the King had her executed. A few days after Anne’s execution, King Henry married Jane Seynour who died after giving birth to Prince Edward, later to become King Edward VI. King Henry then married Anne of Cleves, but that marriage was soon annulled so that he could marry Catherine Howard whom the King later had beheaded. The King’s sixth and last wife was Catherine Paar.

The British Empire was not the last to adopt the Gregorian calendar. Some countries adopted it only within the last 100 years: Russia after their revolution in 1918, Greece in 1923, and China after their 1949 revolution. Many Orthodox religions still use the Julian calendar to set some religious dates. Some Muslim and Hebrew countries still use their own calendar systems.

The Gregorian calendar is not 100% accurate. It adds an average of 26 seconds each year. Like it did to the astronomers of Julius Caesar’s time, these extra 26 seconds may seem insignificant, but their accumulated effect will add an extra day every few thousand years. To make the Gregorian calendar more accurate, it has been proposed to make those years divisible by 4000 to be common years instead of Leap Years as the Gregorian calendar now designates. This proposal has not been adopted.

In some places, it is traditional to give Christmas gifts for each of the Twelve Days of Christmas from December 25 until January 6. In some cultures, January 6 is the day for giving gifts to celebrate the time the Wise Men or Magi arrived to present gifts to the Baby Jesus.

Most of our current Christmas traditions were created in the 1800’s from a melding of the various traditions brought to America by immigrants. One such tradition was to decorate their cabins on Christmas Eve (December 24) and take down those decorations on Old Christmas. The decoration was whatever was available during midwinter and included candles, pine boughs, holly branches, and mistletoe. Homegrown popcorn strung on strings, stored apples, and dried berries were also used.


Much of the edible decorations were consumed on Old Christmas. Cooking, dancing, games, going to church, and visiting were the main Christmastime activities, and much of this merriment occurred on the Twelfth Night or Old Christmas. Christmas in the 1800’s certainly was not commercialized. A small, inexpensive gift or two, accompanied by sweets, were given by the parents to their children. The fireworks were the shooting of guns and much wine and moonshine were consumed.


The Mountain Eagle

From an other article published by The Tellico Plains Mountain Press:

"Our mountain ancestors believed that if a person would stay awake until almost midnight on old Christmas Eve, then sneak quietly out to a barn or a field where any cattle or sheep were kept, they could hear the animals pray. Supposedly, at the exact stroke of midnight on Old Christmas Eve, the animals would start moo-ing and baa-ing and bellowing... not in their normal way, but almost like they were crying. This belief undoubtedly harkened back to the stable in Bethlehem, and to the animals that were present when the Christ Child was revealed to the Magi.

Today, hardly anyone knows of Old Christmas. But, the elder bushes and the animals of the barn and field have surely not forgotten... should anyone like to find out for themselves, on Old Christmas Eve"

Read more here: Old Christmas Eve


Sunday, January 1, 2017

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 121

 
Two Coats
Traditional, arranged by Emory Gordy and Patty Loveless sung by Patty Loveless


 
Two Coats

Two coats were before me
An old and a new
I asked my Sweet Master
Oh what must I do

The old coat was ugly
So tattered and torn
The other a new one
Had never been worn

I'll tell you the best thing
I ever did do
I took off the old coat
And put on the new

The first man was earthly
And made from the ground
We bore all his image
The whole world around

The next was my Savior
From heaven so fair
He brought me this new coat
You now see me wear

I'll tell you the best thing
I ever did do
I took off the old coat
And put on the new

Now this coat it suits me
And keeps me so warm
It's good in the winter
It's good in the storm

My Savior has dressed me
In a garment so rare
He brought me this new coat
You now see me wear

I'll tell you the best thing
I ever did do
I took off the old coat
And put on the new

I'll tell you the best thing
I ever did do
I took off the old coat
And put on the new.....
 
 

Thursday, December 29, 2016

2016

The year 2016 sure went by fast, for me anyhow. One of the year's events that sticks in my mind was the passing of an Appalachian cultural icon, 'Old Time Mountain Style Music' banjo player and singer, Dr. Ralph Stanley. "just plain ol' American Music".

" Ralph Edmund Stanley (February 25, 1927 – June 23, 2016), also known as Dr. Ralph Stanley, was an American bluegrass artist, known for his distinctive singing and banjo playing. Stanley began playing music in 1946, originally with his brother Carter as part of The Stanley Brothers, and most often as the leader of his band, The Clinch Mountain Boys."

Dr. Ralph Stanley will be missed......



Sunday, December 18, 2016

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 120

Beautiful Star of Bethlehem 
Sung by The Stanley Brothers, Carter and Ralph
 

 
Beautiful Star of Bethlehem 

Oh Beautiful Star of Bethlehem
Shining afar through shadows dim
Giving the light for those who long have gone (have gone)
And guiding the Wise Men on their way
Unto the place where Jesus lay
Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, shine on (shine on)

Oh Beautiful Star (Beautiful, Beautiful Star)
Of Bethlehem (Star of Bethlehem)
Shine upon us until the glory dawns
  Give us the light to light the way
Unto the land of perfect day
Oh beautiful Star of Bethlehem, shine on (shine on)
 
 Oh Beautiful star the hope of light
Guiding the pilgrims through the night
Over the mountains 'till the break of dawn (of dawn)
Into the light of perfect day
It will give out a lovely ray
Oh beautiful star of Bethlehem shine on (shine on)

Oh Beautiful Star (Beautiful, Beautiful Star)
Of Bethlehem (Star of Bethlehem)
Shine upon us until the glory dawns
  Give us the light to light the way
Unto the land of perfect day
Oh Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, shine on (shine on)

Oh Beautiful Star the hope of rest
For the redeemed, the good and the blessed
Yonder in glory when the crown is won (is won)
For Jesus is now that star divine
Brighter and brighter He will shine
Oh Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, shine on (shine on)

Oh Beautiful Star (Beautiful, Beautiful Star)
Of Bethlehem (Star of Bethlehem)
Shine upon us until the glory dawns
  Give us the light to light the way
Unto the land of perfect day
Oh Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, shine on (shine on)
 
 

Monday, December 12, 2016

Standards For Sound Genealogical Research

For the past few months I've been researching my paternal collateral lines going back to the children of my 4th Great Grandparents, Valentine Collins and his wife Dicey. In other words the brothers and sisters of the 2 son's of Valentine Collins I descend from, David Collins and Joshua Collins.

So far it's been a very interesting 'journey'. I've been using Ancestry.com to find copies of census records, death records, etc., and Fold3 to find military records.

The most amazing thing I've found looking through different Valentine Collins family trees, is that not a one has accurate data or information, not a one.

The most consistent misinformation is Valentine's date and place of birth. There is no documentation that shows he was born in 1768 or where he was born, and it is impossible that he was born in Wilkes County, North Carolina, as Wilkes County wasn't formed until 1778.

"Wilkes county was formed in 1777 from parts of Surry County and Washington District (now Washington County, Tennessee). The act creating the county became effective on February 15, 1778"
 In 1768 that area would have been Rowen County, North Carolina.

See North Carolina County Formation Maps

If you think it couldn't get worse there are a number of family tree's that show Valentine and wife passing away in 1808, and yet having children born after that date, go figure ? Valentine Collins shows up on the 1840 Morgan County, Kentucky U.S. Census:


Plus, not to mention that many of said children aren't even children of Valentine and Dicey Collins.

With that said, below are 'Standards For Genealogical Research', I think good standards to go by.

Genealogical Standards
Standards For Sound Genealogical Research 
Recommended by the National Genealogical Society

Remembering always that they are engaged in a quest for truth, family history researchers
consistently—

* record the source for each item of information they collect.

* test every hypothesis or theory against credible evidence, and reject those that are not
supported by the evidence.

* seek original records, or reproduced images of them when there is reasonable assurance
they have not been altered, as the basis for their research conclusions.

* use compilations, communications and published works, whether paper or electronic,
primarily for their value as guides to locating the original records, or as contributions to the
critical analysis of the evidence discussed in them.

* state something as a fact only when it is supported by convincing evidence, and identify the
evidence when communicating the fact to others.

* limit with words like "probable" or "possible" any statement that is based on less than
convincing evidence, and state the reasons for concluding that it is probable or possible.

* avoid misleading other researchers by either intentionally or carelessly distributing or
publishing inaccurate information.

* state carefully and honestly the results of their own research, and acknowledge all use of
other researchers’ work.

* recognize the collegial nature of genealogical research by making their work available to
others through publication, or by placing copies in appropriate libraries or repositories, and
by welcoming critical comment.

* consider with open minds new evidence or the comments of others on their work and the
conclusions they have reached.


© 1997, 2002 by National Genealogical Society. Permission is granted to copy or publish this
material provided it is reproduced in its entirety, including this notice.


I'll be posting the results of my research in the near future, stay tuned.

That's my 2 cents....

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Sunday Morning Mountain Gospel Music 119


Away In A Manger
Sung by Kitty Wells 
 

 
Away In A Manger
 
Away in a manger,
No crib for a bed
The little Lord Jesus
Laid down His sweet head
The stars in the sky
Looked down where He lay
The little Lord Jesus
Asleep on the hay

The cattle are lowing
The Baby awakes
The little Lord Jesus
No crying He makes
I love Thee, Lord Jesus
Look down from the sky
And stay by my cradle
til morning is nigh

Be near me, Lord Jesus,
I ask Thee to stay
Close by me forever
And love me I pray.
Bless all the dear children
In Thy tender care
And take us to heaven
To live with Thee there